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13 TED Talks from Nobel Prize winners

When he was 26, Kailash Satyrathi left his job as an electrical engineer. It sounded like a crazy move, but he was determined to help children in India who were forced into labor.

Satyrathi has spent three decades raiding factories where children are held as slaves, building a movement to make the employment of children under 14 illegal in India and broadening this effort to stick up for the rights of children around the world. In 2014, Satyrathi was awarded the Nobel Prize for Peace, alongside Malala Yousafzai, for his work.

We are thrilled that Satyrathi will speak at TED2015. To get you excited, enjoy these talks from nine other Nobel Prize winners:

  1. Leymah Gbowee, winner of the 2011 Prize in Peace, asks us to unlock the intelligence, passion and greatness of girls  (2012)
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  2. James Watson, winner of the 1962 Prize in Medicine, on how we discovered DNA (2005)
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  3. George Smoot, winner of the 2006 Prize in Physics, shares the design of the universe (2008)
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  4. Kary Mullis, winner of the 1993 Prize in Chemistry, celebrates the experiment (2002)
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  5. Kary Mullis on the next-gen cure for killer infections (2009)
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  6. Jody Williams, winner of the 1997 Peace Prize, gives a realistic vision for world peace (2011)
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  7. Murray Gell-Mann, winner of the 1969 Prize in Physics, on the ancestor of language (2007)
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  8. Murray Gell-Mann talks beauty and truth in physics (2007)
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  9. Daniel Kahneman, winner of the 2002 Prize in Economics, brings the riddle of experience vs. memory (2011)
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  10. Al Gore, winner of the 2007 in Prize in Peace, on averting the climate crisis (2006)
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  11. Al Gore gives new thinking on the climate crisis (2008)
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  12. Al Gore warns on the latest climate trends (2009)
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  13. And while Malala Yousafzai, also a winner of the 2014 Peace Prize, couldn’t come to TED lest she miss a week of school, she filmed this video to introduce her father, Ziauddin, and his talk My daughter, Malala (2014)

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Note: This post originally ran in October 2012. It was updated on March 2, 2015.