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Around the World in 80 Telescopes

Posted by: Emily McManus

TED Prize winner Jill Tarter tips us to this event going on right now: Around the World in 80 Telescopes, a live 24-hour telescopecast from astronomical observatories around the world. It’s part of the “100 Hours of Astronomy” celebration happening April 2-5. From the site:

“Around the World in 80 Telescopes” is a unique live 24-hour webcast, following night and day around the globe to some of the most advanced observatories both on and off the planet. You can watch it right here on the 100HA website, and on the 100HA channel on Ustream.tv.

The 24-hour webcast ends 4 April 2009, 09:00 UT (Universal Time/GMT). Both viewing channels are being hit heavily, so be patient, but the images are worth it. On right now: The Millimeter Array at NAOJ Nobeyama in Japan.

The Allen Telescope Array — an effort of the SETI Institute (along with the Radio Astronomy Laboratory at the University of California, Berkeley) — has its 20 minutes of fame tomorrow at 4:40 pm EDT (23:40 UTC). Jill Tarter says: “If you think big telescopes are cool, you can take a look now, or tune in live to see us observing with the ATA.”

Download a short video clip that introduces the ATA >>
Follow 100 Hours of Astronomy on Twitter >>

And watch Jill Tarter make her TED Prize wish to expand the ATA to search for alien intelligence:

Comments (1)

  • Karim Nasser commented on Aug 7 2010

    I truly believe we are alone in the universe, and what I mean by alone, I mean alone. Life exists in one place in time, at any one time, the whole universe must ‘line up’ correctly for life to exist somewhere. We know this in our solar system, in fact our solar system exists the way it does because of where we are in our galaxy, where are galaxy is in the universe.

    I am an atheist, I do not believe that a supreme being exists and is responsible for all creations that we see and don’t see.