TEDTalks

Have you watched all the TEDTalks?

Posted by: Emily McManus

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Inspired by a comment from Benedikt Heinen, the TED Blog would like to know: How many people out there have set a goal to watch all the TEDTalks?

In two weeks, we’re going to be celebrating 5 years of posting TEDTalks online. And if you’ve watched every TEDTalk — we want to celebrate that too. Hit the comments (or email contact@ted.com, or write a blog post and share the link) and let us know:

How did you find TEDTalks?

At what point did you set the goal: “I want to watch every TEDTalk”?

How are you keeping track?

What’s a talk you think you would not have watched without this goal?

What’s your favorite TEDTalk?

What’s something you learned from this experience?

People who’ve set this goal often find the TEDTalks spreadsheet helpful for keeping track.

Comments (18)

  • Jeff Brewer commented on Jan 19 2012

    I completely agree with the previous poster. I’d love to be able to track which videos I’ve watched while logged in to my account here. In fact, one of the reasons I created an account was under the hope that I might find that functionality tied to it. My wish list would be:

    - Titles I’ve watched
    – When I’ve watched
    – A simple rating
    - Titles I want to watch
    - Titles I don’t care to watch

  • PAUL SUNDQUIST commented on Sep 22 2011

    I would REALLY like a way for TED.com to track which episodes that I have watched (or marked as not interested). Point #3 above definitely has some ideas.

    It would be nice to comment on them privately and search:
    - things i’ve seen
    - things i haven’t see
    - ratings and or tags that I have.

    Really, all I want to be able to do is make sure I don’t miss any.

    I currently download everything that is on the RSS Feed, then delete them after I’ve watched them. This doesn’t work though because I will watch some on my phone or on another computer.

    Both TVGuide and next-episode.net do this for regular tv shows.

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  • Mahadevan Venkatakrishnan commented on Jun 17 2011

    1. How did you find TEDTalks?
    Fantabulous. Informative. Arousing curiosity.

    2.At what point did you set the goal: “I want to watch every TEDTalk”?
    I saw the first TEDtalk of Pranav Mistry forwarded by a friend on email a few weeks back. It was out-of-this-world! So I got interested to know about TED and then saw some more. Then again in a few weeks some more…then i got addicted to it. My Goal – to watch 2-3 every day. I have done that for the past 17days…going Strong ;-)

    3.How are you keeping track?
    I created a simple application on my computer. (As a founder of Keeptrak (a tracking answers company which helps anyone keep track of, keep a tab on or keep an eye on so many many things simultaneously!), I have a simple way to Keeptrack of what I have seen – I just tick the talk in my simple application. I would also suggest TED to do the same. People can keep track of these in their log in page – I can help you in this. Let me know. A simple statistical analysis like your Sebastian Wernicke!). Second, I wouldn’t watch all 100% because I would like to research more on those I saw.

    What’s a talk you think you would not have watched without this goal?
    The hidden power of smiling, by Ron Gutman.

    What’s your favorite TEDTalk?
    VS Ramachandran on your mind – This was a journey into the mind! I could instantly relate to it, as my boss in my earlier job had the Phantom limb sensations after he lost his limb and was fitted with a microprocessor controlled, carbon fibre leg!

    What’s something you learned from this experience?
    What we know of our minds and the universe is atomic!

  • Mahadevan Venkatakrishnan commented on Jun 17 2011

    I saw the first TEDtalk of Pranav Mistry forwarded by a friend on email. Then i saw some more. Then again in a few weeks some more…then i got addicted to it. Now I watch 2-3 every day. As a founder of Keeptrak (a tracking answers company which helps anyone keep track of, keep a tab on or keep an eye on so many many things simultaneously!), I have a simple way to Keeptrack of what I have seen – I just tick the talk in my simple application. I would also suggest TED to do the same. People can keep track of these in their log in page – I can help you in this. Let me know. A simple statistical analysis like your Sebastian Wernicke!

  • Patty Gear commented on Jun 16 2011

    I just started watching TED beginning 2011 & I’d say that each is great! Keep it up!

  • frack ren commented on Jun 15 2011

    That’s my goal.I’d like to watch all the TED talks in the future.

  • Umang Saini commented on Jun 13 2011

    Every single one. My list and detailed answers at my blog – http://poloolop.blogspot.com/2011/06/five.html

    Thanks.

  • Benedikt Heinen commented on Jun 13 2011

    Jan Doggen: The RSS feed is properly updated, but it’s also truncated. If you look at the raw feed, it ‘only’ goes back the last 115 talks to Charles Limb’s talk “Your brain on improv”…

    So, anyone subscribing now ‘only’ gets the talks published back to about the beginning of this year – but many were before then. To see whether you have all the talks, just check how many you have (unless you deleted the old ones)… The spreadsheet linked above shows 965 talks.

  • nechama silberberg commented on Jun 13 2011

    I’m watching All the speakers in alphabetical order- I’m up to m (last name). I’ve memorized the last speaker on every page and I flip through the pages periodically to see if there are new ones I’ve missed…:)

  • John Chase commented on Jun 13 2011

    I’ve seen them all (perhaps with one or two exceptions?). I keep up with them by RSS feed. Every time there’s a new one, I watch it. Keep the great talks coming!

  • Jan Doggen commented on Jun 13 2011

    I discovered TED almost three years ago, and assuming your RSS feed is properly updated, never missed a video since.

  • Kristopher Bertoglio commented on Jun 12 2011

    It took about 2.5 years to get completely caught up and I’m glad I did.

    How did you find TEDTalks?
    Someone shared Sir Ken’s first talk on an email group for teachers. After that, I had to see more.

    At what point did you set the goal: “I want to watch every TEDTalk”?
    The first time I shared a TEDTalk with a student and realized the potential impact they could have on kids’ lives. I realized that the more of these I saw, the more students I could help in this way.

    How are you keeping track?
    iTunes.

    What’s a talk you think you would not have watched without this goal?
    Most of the musical ones and a few of the hippie ones.

    What’s your favorite TEDTalk?
    Although it hasn’t been posted on TED.com (and might be too controversial to ever post), Gary Stager’s talk at TEDxNYED. I also enjoy just about anything connected to education or education reform, especially Sugata Mitra’s and Ken Robinson’s.

    What’s something you learned from this experience?
    Passionate, dedicated people at the cutting edges of their fields are really interesting.
    TED talks are a great tool in connecting students with their life’s passions.

  • Benedikt Heinen commented on Jun 12 2011

    Since the blog post was inspired by a comment I made… My little TED history:

    Originally I found out about TED several years back after seeing a link to Carl Honore’s talk in praise of slowness on another blog. After seeing this one and I looked at some of the links to other talks, and over time got into the habit of watching them. Following the first few on the web, I just subscribed to the video RSS feed on the site and watched them straight from within iTunes.

    Originally I concentrated on talks that revolved around subjects I was already interested in, and only got into watching others almost accidentally – when the title made me think one thing and it was actually about another. For instance – having never heard of Evelyn Glennie before, I thought a talk about ‘how to listen’ would be more about how to properly listen in conversations – when the talk was about how to listen to music.

    Keeping track really is mostly done by iTunes’ ‘Last-played Date’; as I’m not really watching them on the web, but mostly from within iTunes or the iPad. The only thing I had to do at some point, was write a script that reads all the themed TED talk RSS feeds and merges them together into a single one, eliminating duplicates, downloading all existing talks from that, and then using the regular RSS feed to keep getting the latest ones. Honestly, TED, if there is one thing you could improve – create a full RSS feed with ALL talks reaching all the way back.

    My favourite TED talk – that’s the hard part. There are so many good ones that picking one always seems too much like dissing others. Apart from always syncing the latest new TED talks to my iPad, I also keep my ‘favourite TED talks’ on it at all times. These faves currently make just over 50 of the TED talks. Some of these I tend to occasionally rewatch… And – go figure – one of the talks I tend to occasionally listen in to again contains this quote:

    “Who of you has ever bought or rented a video you’ve watched before? Who’s done this? Get a f***ing life!”

    It was a somewhat slow process of getting into TED over the years. It’s always had great talks, and only very few I didn’t quite warm up to. Three spring to mind, but without spelling out to closely which ones: One was an interview (which I don’t think suits TED quite so well); one was on a very important topic, by someone very passionate about it, but wasted the opportunity by making the talk too preachy and too angry; the last one that really got to me primarily got to me because as a talk it was good, but I oppose the presenters points. Two other TEDsters, one in a TED talk, the other one outside of TED, made more convincing cases for the opposite point.

    Going back to ‘favourite’ TED talks, my current faves are (sorted by first name, as the talks all give first name first): AJ Jacobs, Benjamin Zander, Bruce Schneier, Charles Leadbeater, Daniel Kahneman, David Meslin, David Agus, David Logan, David S. Rose, Elizabeth Pisani, Erin McKean, Ethan Zuckerman, Evelyn Glennie, George Dyson, Hans Rosling, Jaime Lerner, Jonathan Drori, Jonathan Haidt, Kamal Meattle, Kathryn Schulz, Ken Robinson, Larry Lessig, Lewis Pugh, Mark Bittman, Michael Pollan, Peter Donnelly, Ric Elias, Richard St. John, Rives, Robert Lang, Rory Sutherland, Sam Richards, Sean Carroll, Seth Godin, Stanley McChrystal, Temple Grandin, Thomas Barnett, Tom Wujec, Rony Robbins, William Li.

  • Chris Plough commented on Jun 12 2011

    Ha! Still have many to go, but I do keep track of them in Evernote :) My close friends and I pass our favorites around and that’s an interesting way to watch new ones – including those that I would otherwise pass over. So far, my favorites are: anything by Hans Rosling (he had me after swallowing the bayonet), “A life lesson from a volunteer firefighter” by Mark Bezos, and “Thomas Barnett draws a new map for peace”.

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  • Emkay Jaffer commented on Jun 12 2011

    I was 16 and I didn’t give a hoot.
    Science? Education? These were the last things on my mind, the only passions I held, stemmed from an incurable curiosity for shiny new gadgets and video games.

    That was, until a friend and I stumbled upon a talk on spaghetti sauce by the unlikely, Malcolm Gladwell. I laughed, coo’d in amazement as all that was said made perfect sense to me; and then, I was hooked.

    TED inspired my education, it opened my eyes to disciplines I would otherwise not have encountered, it encouraged me to think creatively and practically.

    Now when I think about technology, I can’t help but seek out connections between computing, language, anthropology and neuroscience.

    I can’t stop spouting ideas for using game systems for more engaging education.

    Now my passion is lifelong learning, which is why I aim to watch them all.

  • Yoav Medan commented on Jun 12 2011

    Every Saturday evening we have a family screening of “TEDs of the Week” on our large screen TV/Monitor connected to the internet, using a MIRO Player TED feed. This is our way of keeping up with all TED videos being posted.