Topics > Fellows Friday

Stories for "Fellows Friday"

Eye phone: How a TED Fellow’s new app could help restore sight to millions

Eye phone: How a TED Fellow’s new app could help restore sight to millions

on

Around 39 million people in the world are affected by blindness — 80% of which could be avoided if people had timely access to diagnosis and proper treatment. The problem is that in many developing countries, most eye care providers are in cities, while the majority of patients live in hard-to-reach rural areas. To bridge this gap, London-based opthalmologist Andrew Bastawrous created Peek — an app []

How mega-landscaping might reshape the world

How mega-landscaping might reshape the world

on

Picture a spillway gate that doesn’t just release water from an overflowing river, but manipulates sediments to create new streams, islands and wetlands. And imagine that the gate does this autonomously, guided by ecological data and shifting needs — essentially allowing nature to “evolve.” Computational landscape architect Bradley Cantrell is figuring how to do this by applying []

Brave new weird: Inside the funhouse art experiences of Gabriel Barcia-Colombo

Brave new weird: Inside the funhouse art experiences of Gabriel Barcia-Colombo

on

Vending machines that sell human DNA. People trapped in jars and blenders. Bottles of perfume that smell like burning books. You have to expect the unexpected with Gabriel Barcia-Colombo, a New York–based artist who works with film, electronics, performance, biomaterials and more to create mind-bending interactive artworks. His latest piece, “New York Minute,” confronts commuters in []

A rugged, mobile wifi device brings the web to schools in Africa and beyond

A rugged, mobile wifi device brings the web to schools in Africa and beyond

on

BRCK is best described as a “backup generator for the internet.” When it was announced, the idea of a rugged, rechargeable, mobile wifi device captured imaginations as a good way to bring robust connectivity to people in places with spotty infrastructure – particularly in developing countries. The device is the brainchild of Nairobi-based technology company Ushahidi, and was created partly out of []

Ordinary people in an extraordinary moment: Portraits of the men + women caught up in revolution in Ukraine

Ordinary people in an extraordinary moment: Portraits of the men + women caught up in revolution in Ukraine

on

When Anastasia Taylor-Lind found herself in Kiev at the height of violence during Ukraine’s Independence Square protests, the documentary photographer decided to record not the fighting itself, but the human beings involved. Setting up a makeshift photo studio in an alleyway inside the barricaded square, she beckoned passers-by — the protesters themselves, and later the women who came []

Art that floats: A TED Fellow plans an immersive experience on a boat

Art that floats: A TED Fellow plans an immersive experience on a boat

on

Constance Hockaday makes large-scale installations on open water. Identifying as a Chilean-American queer artist, Hockaday creates spaces that celebrate creative freedom and counterculture communities while defying gentrification. Take the Floating Peep Show — in which out-of-work drag queens and exotic dancers performed in the hulls of sailboats in the middle of San Francisco Bay. Now, Hockaday plans to turn a []

Invasion of the golden mussel: A TED Fellow wields genes to protect the Amazon

Invasion of the golden mussel: A TED Fellow wields genes to protect the Amazon

on

Back in the ’90s, the golden mussel (Limnoperna fortunei) hitched a ride on ships traveling from Asia to South America. In the past decade and a half, the mussel has proliferated through South America’s river systems, destroying the native habitat and disrupting the operation of power plants and water treatment facilities. This invasive species now threatens the delicate []

Imagination in health and medicine? 11 fresh ideas from the TEDMED stage

Imagination in health and medicine? 11 fresh ideas from the TEDMED stage

on

Prosthetics as sculpture, the maternal benefits of breast milk, Cuba’s radical approach to free medical education. These are just a few of the subjects tackled at TEDMED 2014: Unlocking Imagination, hosted last week simultaneously in San Francisco and Washington, DC, with a stage program directed by TED Fellow, physician, novelist and activist Nassim Assefi. On two stages []

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Fotokite! Sergei Lupashin brings aerial photography down to Earth

It’s a bird! It’s a plane! It’s Fotokite! Sergei Lupashin brings aerial photography down to Earth

on

With his tethered quadcopter Fotokite, Russian-born inventor Sergei Lupashin plans to put aerial photography and the power of unmanned aerial vehicles in the hands of of journalists, architects and artists. Interestingly, this device was actually inspired by a 2011 protest in Russia. We talked to Lupashin to find out more about this inciting moment, and about how []

Orphans of the narrative: Bosnian photographer Ziyah Gafić documents the aftermath of war

Orphans of the narrative: Bosnian photographer Ziyah Gafić documents the aftermath of war

on

Bosnian photojournalist Ziyah Gafić photographs the aftermath of conflict. (Watch his TED Talk, “Everyday objects, tragic histories.”) In his most recent book, Quest for Identity, he catalogs the belongings of Bosnia’s genocide victims, everyday objects like keys, books, combs and glasses that were exhumed from mass graves. The objects are still being used to identify the bodies []

On origami, Alzheimer’s & kindness: Global health expert Alanna Shaikh rethinks preparing for dementia

On origami, Alzheimer’s & kindness: Global health expert Alanna Shaikh rethinks preparing for dementia

on

Global health expert Alanna Shaikh gave an unexpected and moving talk at TEDGlobal 2012, called “How I’m preparing to get Alzheimer’s.” In it, she told the story of her father’s struggle with the disease, and outlined some strategies she’d devised in case dementia struck her later in life, too. The TED Blog was curious: How is her experiment []

A perpetual tourist who makes his own souvenirs: The intriguing work of artist Jorge Mañes Rubio

A perpetual tourist who makes his own souvenirs: The intriguing work of artist Jorge Mañes Rubio

on

From China’s underwater cities to Amsterdam’s neglected neighborhoods to Italy’s looted ruins, Jorge Mañes Rubio seeks out forsaken places and makes art that memorializes, reimagines and reengages them with the world. His project “Normal Pool Level” — which emerged from his exploration of the cities, towns and villages submerged by China’s Three Gorges Dam Project []