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A noninvasive method for deep brain stimulation, a new class of Emerging Explorers, and much more

A noninvasive method for deep brain stimulation, a new class of Emerging Explorers, and much more

As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. Surface-level brain stimulation. The delivery of an electric current to the part of the brain involved in movement control, known as deep brain stimulation, is sometimes used to treat people with Parkinson’s disease, depression, epilepsy and obsessive compulsive disorder. []

Filmmaker Jen Brea gets a Sundance fellowship, Pamela Ronald makes the case for engineered rice, and more

Filmmaker Jen Brea gets a Sundance fellowship, Pamela Ronald makes the case for engineered rice, and more

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Behold, your recap of TED-related news: A new Sundance grant helps indie films get seen. Making a film is hard enough — but getting the film seen by an audience can be just as difficult, especially in this era of non-stop media shifts. To help, Sundance just launched the Creative Distribution Fellowship — and among []

Wireless advances in treating spinal cord damage, morphing wings for aircraft, and the world’s tallest tropical trees

Wireless advances in treating spinal cord damage, morphing wings for aircraft, and the world’s tallest tropical trees

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Just a few of the intriguing headlines involving members of the TED community this week: Advances in treating spinal cord damage. In Nature, Grégoire Courtine and a team of scientists announced that they had successfully used a wireless brain-spine interface to help monkeys with spinal cord damage paralyzing one leg regain the ability to walk. []

A basic income pilot, the history of the gene, and the future of transportation

A basic income pilot, the history of the gene, and the future of transportation

As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. A real-world test of basic income. Too often, humanitarian aid donations of food and materials, while well-intentioned, aren’t what the recipients actually need. But what about a different approach: giving people a basic income to spend however they like. []

Life on the Chinese-North Korean border, putting the joy back in voting, and an encouragement to give up

Life on the Chinese-North Korean border, putting the joy back in voting, and an encouragement to give up

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North Korean borderlands. Hotel rooms outfitted with binoculars to peer across the river at the forbidden land, spotty phone connections and a bridge partially destroyed by Korean War-era bombs, and smugglers of diamonds, watches and expensive face creams: This is the Chinese-North Korean border, a world of shifting identities and coded language. In the New []

A voyage to our closest star, the surprising paradox of an elephant’s brain, and rethinking college rankings

A voyage to our closest star, the surprising paradox of an elephant’s brain, and rethinking college rankings

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As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. A 4.37-lightyear starshot. Humanity has sent people to the moon and rovers to Mars. It might be about time we embark on interstellar travel. Russian philanthropist Yuri Milner, along with board member Stephen Hawking, unveiled a plan on Tuesday []