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Your weekend reading: In defense of the red line, a public health heroine

Posted By Thu-Huong Ha

Intriguing reads from around the Internets this week: Two journalists on why the red line on chemical warfare is necessary. [Foreign Affairs] The story of Sara Josephine Baker, a doctor who saved 90,000 inner-city children by the time she died in 1945. [NYRB] “You can’t defend the humanities by declaring it off limits to amateurs.” […]

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Your weekend reading: Our mysterious Internet

Posted By Thu-Huong Ha

A look at what’s been going on in this mysterious web of ours the past few weeks: What…the…is this crazy-looking cocoon? Help the Internet figure it out! [New Scientist] Bruce Schneier‘s call to engineers and technologists to stand up and take back the Internet from the inside. [The Guardian] What can go wrong when secondary […]

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Your weekend reading: Management 101 for terrorists, the woman who helped Snowden

Posted By Thu-Huong Ha

While the TED Blog chills for the next two weeks, take a break to read some of our favorite pieces from around the Internet over the past seven days: A fascinating, at times hilarious, look at business management practices in high-threat terrorist organizations. [Foreign Affairs] A profile of Laura Poitras, the documentary filmmaker who helped […]

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Your weekend reading: Gary’s Glass, a malarial milestone

Posted By Thu-Huong Ha

A round-up of what’s interesting on the interwebs this week: Gary Shteyngart tries Google Glass. Hilarity ensues. [The New Yorker] To everyone’s surprise, a malaria vaccine has been 100 percent effective in clinical trials. [Nature] For writers, adopting a second language is more than gaining a new skill set. It’s a rebirth. [The Stone Blog, […]

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Your weekend reading: The purpose of life, an excellent mushroom timelapseYour weekend reading: The purpose of life, an excellent mushroom timelapse

Posted By Thu-Huong Ha

Interesting, informative, bizarre. Here’s a round-up of interwebs reading from the past few weeks: Mushrooms are not at the top of my favorite foods list but, above, see why they are now at the top of my favorite things to watch a timelapse video of.  Shot by cinematographer Louie Schwartzberg (watch his TED Talks) and starring mushroom […]

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Your weekend reading: The value of coders, a Chinese school lecture from space

Posted By Thu-Huong Ha

Some staff-picked food for thought from around the interwebs this week: It’s a coder’s world. But a web developer asks, is his high-paid job actually valuable? [Aeon magazine] A Chinese astronaut holds a school lesson from space. [Al Jazeera] A new report on the continuing decline of the humanities in U.S. education systems. [The New […]

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Your weekend reading: Damsels in distress, the sounds of pots in Istanbul, and more

Posted By Thu-Huong Ha

Below, find some interesting and insightful pieces from around the web this week that have the TED staff intrigued: The second installment in the smart, darkly funny “Damsel in Distress” series, a three-part analysis of female tropes pervasive in video games. Contains game spoilers and violent images. [YouTube] You can also watch Part 1. We think Jackson’s Katz’s […]

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Your weekend reading: Depression in comics, betting on the origin of the universe

Posted By Thu-Huong Ha

A round-up of funny, interesting and strange stories on the Internet this week: Hyperbole and a Half’s Allie Brosh is back after a two-year hiatus, with part 2 of an illustrated account of overcoming depression. Dark and delightful. [Hyperbole and a Half] Even world-famous scientists have tiffs. Obviously this bet between Stephen Hawking and Neil […]

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Your weekend reading: The wrong kind of Caucasian, the graduate school question, and how the Internet ruined everything

Posted By Thu-Huong Ha

A weekly round-up of interesting, weird and useful reads from around the interwebs. In “The wrong kind of Caucasian,” Sarah Kendzior critiques the media for its tendency to demonize an entire country based on the violent acts of a few individuals. [Al Jazeera] “The Internet: A Warning from History,” or how the Internet ruined everything. […]