Environment

Aerial photos of the oil slick

Posted by: Matthew Trost

James Duncan Davidson, TED’s conference photographer, is among a crew of five photographers and videographers reporting on the Gulf of Mexico for the TEDxOilSpill Expedition. His photos, taken aboard a plane above the Deepwater Horizon accident site, reveal the staggering extent of the oil slick. See the full photo set >>

Burning Oil

Burning oil on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico.

Slick

The first major oil slick we saw on the way to the Deepwater Horizon site.

Burning Oil

Burning Oil

Burning Oil

Burning Oil

Burning oil on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico.

The Source

The Source

The Deepwater Horizon accident site.

Surface Oil

Surface Oil

Surface Oil

Oil on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico.

Discoverer Enterprise

The Discoverer Enterprise at the Deepwater Explorer disaster site.

Controlled Burn

Gas is flared in a controlled burn at the Deepwater Horizon disaster site.

Discoverer Enterprise

The Discoverer Enterprise at the Deepwater Explorer disaster site.

Controlled Burn

Gas is flared in a controlled burn at the Deepwater Horizon disaster site.

Discoverer Enterprise

The Discoverer Enterprise at the Deepwater Explorer disaster site.

Deepwater Driller II

Deepwater Driller II at the Deepwater Horizon disaster site. This is one of two drilling rigs drilling the relief wells.

Surface Oil

Oil on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico.

Burning Oil

Burning oil on the surface of the Gulf of Mexico.

All photos in this set credit: James Duncan Davidson. June 17th, 2010.

For more information:

Help Support the TEDxOilSpill Expedition Team

Follow @TEDxOilSpill on Twitter

TEDxOilSpill event

Static Photography heads down to the Gulf with TEDxOilSpill Expedition

TEDxOilSpill Expedition photos by Kris Krüg

TEDxOilSpill photos by Duncan Davidson

TEDxOilSpill photos by Pinar Ozger

Comments (14)

  • Pingback: TED para fotógrafos. TED for photographers by Rafael Montero | Rafael Montero Photography

  • Pingback: Oil-spill cleanup tech wins million-dollar X Challenge | Freedom Developers

  • Pingback: Oil-spill cleanup tech wins million-dollar X Challenge | Krantenkoppen Tech

  • Bienvenido Jimenez commented on Jun 26 2010

    These photos are very useful to everyone… To the investigators, to the authority and to the simple individual so they may be aware of what was really the situation on this kind of disaster in the middle of the sea.

  • raabita raabita commented on Jun 25 2010

    These photos are worth spreading to make this planet a safer place for all the living beings.

  • Laura Kelly commented on Jun 24 2010

    Dear humans:

    I would like my Earth back

    Thanks

  • Susan Rooney-Harding commented on Jun 21 2010

    all those amazing thinkers at TED have you got any ideas on how this can be stopped!!
    I challenge TED to create a TED Challenge to come up with ideas on how this can be stopped for good.

  • SAcha Khoh commented on Jun 20 2010

    The ability to see real anywhere in the world is thanks to photo’s like these and people like Naomi Klein.

    http://www.guardian.co.uk/theguardian/2010/jun/19/naomi-klein-gulf-oil-spill

  • Rey Benedict Alonso commented on Jun 19 2010

    These photos are important and helpful so that people would be aware how the oil spill had damage our seas.

  • Funeral Poems commented on Jun 18 2010

    Exclusive photographs on the disaster of Gulf of Mexico.

  • Corey and Tam Cottrell commented on Jun 18 2010

    wish these pictures had dates.
    it is hard to know what is real and what is media driven

    • Matthew Trost commented on Jun 18 2010

      Good point! All of these photos were taken on June 17th.

    • Brian Lee commented on Jun 18 2010

      In this context, “media driven” doesn’t mean anything. Everything here is “media driven.” Do you need conclusive evidence of what’s going on, or do you have a better point to raise than pointing out that something falls within some kind of arbitrary and irrelevant guideline?

      If you’re trying to invalidate these photos by the fact that they don’t have dates, keep in mind that you can put dates on anything.

    • Sean OBoyle commented on Jun 19 2010

      The implication that the photos are not real is outrageous.
      And I’m struggling to understand the distinction between reality and that which is media driven. A photo *is* media – so yeah – this is media driven information.

      Are you trying to imply that these images have been spun to make the disaster appear worse than it is? I just don’t think that is possible. You can’t find a lens with a wide enough focal length to capture how awful this truly is. ~sarcasm~You should demand that the photographer take some shots of where the oil isn’t! There is still more ocean that is not covered by oil than is covered by oil!~sarcasm~

      Friend, this is real. An oil platform broke and now oil is spilling into the gulf of mexico at a rate that we are currently unable to keep up with.

      It may be heartbreaking and hard to comprehend, but rest assured, it’s real.