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New on TED Books: Cindy Gallop’s “Make Love Not Porn”

Posted by: Emily McManus

The amazing Cindy Gallop — whose 2009 TEDTalk was a powerful look at the effects of online porn on a generation of young people — has expanded the short talk into a thoughtful TED Book. In Make Love Not Porn: Technology’s Hardcore Impact on Human Behavior, Gallop talks about the personal experiences and research that inspired her to give the talk — and the explosive growth of the website MakeLoveNotPorn.com since the talk went viral. She shares stories of people who’ve learned from her talk and from the site, from people who’ve supported it and challenged it.

It’s an important read about the new realities of intimacy in the digital age.

Make Love Not Porn is part of the TED Books series available for the Kindle and Kindle Reader apps.

Comments (5)

  • Sheri Rivers commented on Oct 1 2013

    I can’t help but feel that the barrage of negative comments from a few INTENSLY aggravated men(?) who somehow feel this 4 minute video was made for no other reason than to point specifically at them (which it was not) not only backs up her concern, it actually highlights the need for some sort of intervention. The amount of anger behind some of the comments, and of course some of the comments themselves, shows an incredibly dark side of something that shouldn’t even HAVE a dark side to it. Being female, some of the comments sent a chill up my spine, similar to that of being mentally undressed by a stranger while riding the subway, alone, late at night. If for some reason, after viewing this video you feel that it WAS directed at you in any way, then maybe, just maybe this would be a clear sign of the inevitable shoe that fits? Is it not possibly that a brief moment of self reflection might restore some sort of clarity in your relationships, if not salvage them ?
    There have been similar problems called to front, about many things. However, the one that intrigued me the most, was the fact that not only was porn on the rise (no pun intended) but so was the need, and use of Viagra. Is it possible that the neurological programming of the younger male is capable of learning arousal from watching vs actually doing? I mean, even in thinking of sex, say masturbation, fantasy, etc. one generally includes THEMSELVES in the act, rather than being a non-participant merely watching,….? Men, being more visual than women across the board, would seem to be more vulnerable here, as well. What, if when given the opportunity to be a part of the act, men who are so used to watching, find that they cannot become aroused without the visual stimulation that the brain has become so accustomed to associating the physical response with ? Has anyone ever done any studies on this? It’s just a thought. Hey guys,….if any of you out there can relate, or stress over ED, etc. can you give the porn a break for a few weeks and see if, by chance, you may NOT have a “problem” after all? Wouldn’t THAT be something to shout about?

  • michael luke vumi ndhlovu commented on Aug 18 2012

    The young generation of today needs more teachings like, the Age of technology has also become an Age ignorance,,

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