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A  redesign for death, a monument hidden in plain sight and the intelligence of a bird brain

A redesign for death, a monument hidden in plain sight and the intelligence of a bird brain

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A design competition to reimagine death. 100 percent of the human population will die, and yet, why don’t we design for this inevitable outcome? OpenIDEO, design and innovation firm IDEO’s online innovation platform, has launched a new public design challenge to “reimagine the end of life experience.” BJ Miller is an advisor on the project []

A new take on an old school, the diet myth, and protecting North Korean women

A new take on an old school, the diet myth, and protecting North Korean women

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Abandoned school turned maker space. Theaster Gates turns Chicago’s abandoned buildings into thriving hubs for art and education. His next project? Turning an old elementary school into a maker space. Gates heads Place Lab, a think tank that fuses the brainpower of urban planners, architects, artists and other diverse professionals to create “culture-led neighborhood transformation”. []

Opening day for Venice Biennale, an invisible landmark, and an economist’s look at Uber’s surge pricing

Opening day for Venice Biennale, an invisible landmark, and an economist’s look at Uber’s surge pricing

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The TED community has been very busy over the past few weeks. Below, some newsy highlights. 121 years of celebrating art. Originally an art exhibition, the Venice Biennale is a tradition stretching back to 1895 and has expanded over the years to include events for music, theater, film, dance and architecture. Opening on May 28, []

Life on the Chinese-North Korean border, putting the joy back in voting, and an encouragement to give up

Life on the Chinese-North Korean border, putting the joy back in voting, and an encouragement to give up

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North Korean borderlands. Hotel rooms outfitted with binoculars to peer across the river at the forbidden land, spotty phone connections and a bridge partially destroyed by Korean War-era bombs, and smugglers of diamonds, watches and expensive face creams: This is the Chinese-North Korean border, a world of shifting identities and coded language. In the New []

A voyage to our closest star, the surprising paradox of an elephant’s brain, and rethinking college rankings

A voyage to our closest star, the surprising paradox of an elephant’s brain, and rethinking college rankings

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As usual, the TED community has lots of news to share this week. Below, some highlights. A 4.37-lightyear starshot. Humanity has sent people to the moon and rovers to Mars. It might be about time we embark on interstellar travel. Russian philanthropist Yuri Milner, along with board member Stephen Hawking, unveiled a plan on Tuesday []

An ultra-low-cost online MBA launches today … and more news from TED speakers

An ultra-low-cost online MBA launches today … and more news from TED speakers

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  Shai Reshef’s nonprofit University of the People — which offers nearly tuition-free, accredited degrees online — today launches its first graduate degree, an MBA program in 12 courses. Although there are no tuition or textbook fees, there is a $200 testing fee per course, which means students can expect to pay $2,400 for their MBA (compare this to the average cost []

A “living fossil” spotted in the South Pacific, a machine that vomits + poetry that rethinks assumptions about inmates

A “living fossil” spotted in the South Pacific, a machine that vomits + poetry that rethinks assumptions about inmates

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The TED community has news to share. Read on for highlights. The rarest animal on Earth, spotted once again. Peter Ward hadn’t seen his “old friend,” the Allonautilus scrobiculatus, since 1984. But he recognized its hairy, slimy, golden shell instantly. Ward wrote about his rediscovery of this creature — alongside its more-common relative, the nautilus, []