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Stories for "neuroscience"

The hierarchy in your brain: Ray Kurzweil at TED2014

The hierarchy in your brain: Ray Kurzweil at TED2014

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Ray Kurzweil returns to the TED stage to explain his new (kind of old) theory of the mind. He first wrote his theory as a paper 50 years ago, but today there’s a plethora of new evidence to support it. First, a refresher on the story of the neocortex, which means “new rind.” Two hundred []

The hard problem of consciousness: David Chalmers at TED2014

The hard problem of consciousness: David Chalmers at TED2014

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“Right now you have a movie playing inside your head,” says philosopher David Chalmers. It’s an amazing movie, with 3D, smell, taste, touch, a sense of body, pain, hunger, emotions, memories, and a constant voice-over narrative. “At the heart of this movie is you, experiencing this, directly. This movie is your stream of consciousness, experience []

The brain is a Swiss Army knife: Nancy Kanwisher at TED2014

The brain is a Swiss Army knife: Nancy Kanwisher at TED2014

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Special note: Watch for this talk to post in the next few weeks! Onstage at TED, Nancy Kanwisher starts by telling us one of the most surprising results from recent neuroscience discoveries: The brain is not a general-purpose processor, but a collection of specialized components, “collectively building up who we are as human beings and thinkers.” []

Questions you may have about Mary Lou Jepsen’s TED Talk

Questions you may have about Mary Lou Jepsen’s TED Talk

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Mary Lou Jepsen’s talk about the future of brain-reading devices was widely discussed at TED2013 and, after the conference, we received a few very specific technical and scientific questions from attendees who watched it live. Jepsen’s is the kind of talk that tests the limit of TED’s short-talk format — it’s full of technical information []

A promising first step for those with spinal cord injury: Further reading on electrical stimulation and how it’s helped rats (and one human!) walk again

A promising first step for those with spinal cord injury: Further reading on electrical stimulation and how it’s helped rats (and one human!) walk again

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Grégoire Courtine and the scientists in his lab helped a paralyzed rat learn to walk again, voluntarily, through a treatment that combined drugs, electrical stimulation of the lower spinal cord, the support of a robotic arm and a little bit of chocolate. When their study appeared in the June 2012 issue of Science, it sparked []

Nerves, bones, words: Fellows Friday with Ivana Gadjanski

Nerves, bones, words: Fellows Friday with Ivana Gadjanski

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Biologist, poet and fledgling entrepreneur Ivana Gadjanski has worked on using animal toxins as a possible treatment for MS, and is growing bones and cartilage in dishes. She has also published two books of poetry in Serbia. Now she’s developing Pubsonic, an online research tool that allows users to access free medical journal papers via []

Regeneration: The speakers in Session 7 at TEDGlobal 2013

Regeneration: The speakers in Session 7 at TEDGlobal 2013

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Session 7, “Regeneration,” couldn’t come at a better time; it’s the end of the second day of TEDGlobal 2013, and we could all use a little repair and restoration. In this session, four scientists and researchers look closely at the ways in which the body breaks down — and how we can rebuild them. Here []

Introducing the RoboRoach: Greg Gage at TEDGlobal 2013

Introducing the RoboRoach: Greg Gage at TEDGlobal 2013

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Talking as fast and fervently as a circus busker, TED Fellow Greg Gage introduces the world to RoboRoach — a kit that allows you create a cockroach cyborg and control its movements via an iPhone app and “the world’s first commercially available cyborg in the history of mankind.” “I’m a neuroscientist,” says Gage, “and that []

The neuroscience of sleep: Russell Foster at TEDGlobal 2013

The neuroscience of sleep: Russell Foster at TEDGlobal 2013

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Neuroscientist Russell Foster opens a session of TEDGlobal all about … us, asking the question: Why do we sleep? Thirty-six percent of our lives are spent asleep, which means, if you live to 90, you’ll have slept for 32 years. But we don’t appreciate sleep enough, says Foster. He quotes Thomas Edison — “Sleep is []